Top Ten Tuesday (31)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top 10 Contemporary Books That Would Be Great Paired With A Required Reading Book (like Perks of Being A Wallflower with Catcher in the Rye) OR Top Ten Books That You Wish Were Taught In Schools

Hmm… This week’s topic is a really interesting one which ever one you pick but it’s been a while since I was in school. The only required reading I had between 11 and 18 either involved Shakespeare or a contemporary, poetry, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry or reading around WWI poetry. I honestly cannot remember reading anything else. So I don’t think I could give a good answer to this week’s topic. Instead, I am going to do:

Six Books which I think should be on a Required Reading List for the topic of Vampires.

1. DRACULA by Brahm Stoker.

It is, after all, with this book that everything started.

2. INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE by Anne Rice.

I would of course encourage you to read the first four books in THE VAMPIRE CHRONICLES, but this book is a must read for any vampire fan. It is, I think, the book that made many people fall in love with the vampire character.

3. GUILTY PLEASURES by Laurell K. Hamilton.

Okay, I know a lot of people will groan at this. BUT I think Hamilton does some interesting things to the genre of the vampire with this book. For a start, the main character is a vampire hunter. Yes, there was Buffy on the TV but I think that this was one of the first books that did this. I also liked the fact that it’s pretty clear what vampires hunt and how dangerous they are.

4. VAMPIRE ACADEMY by Richelle Mead.

The first YA on the list. This book is interesting because the vampires have more Eastern European roots than either Rice or Hamilton’s vampires. It also puts vampires in a high school setting, and whilst it isn’t the first to do so I think Mead does it well. Then there’s the fact that there are two different types of vampire in this world.

5. THE IMMORTAL RULES by Julie Kagawa.

This is a slightly different take on the vampire to any of the above books, and I think it explores the genre in a unique and interesting way. It could be really interesting to compare the vampires in this book to the ones in the others.

6. MINION by L. A. Banks.

This is the only series that I have come across that features vampires who are PoC. It links with THE IMMORTAL RULES in that they both have non-white leads, which seems to be pretty rare in the genre – it might be interesting to explore this.

So there’s my list. I would have loved to include vampire books that explored vampires who are LBGT (which doesn’t include everything, and I hope is right) and if anyone has any recs they would be much appreciated. The idea behind this list was basically I wanted to treat it like a particular topic in a Lit degree. I’ve only included brief thoughts on why I would include them in a list. I would love to hear what you think about my picks, and if I’ve missed something you think should be on the list.

Thanks for stopping by.

Top Ten Tuesday (30)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Things That Make Your Life As A Reader/Book Blogger Easier

The list is in no particular order. And sorry, but no pictures this week.

  1. My Local Library – I don’t use it very often admittedly, but visiting it occasionally does help keep my costs down. And it’s super helpful if I want to try an author, but I’m not 100% confident that I’ll like them.
  2. Goodreads – it keeps track of what I’ve read, what I’m reading now, and books that have caught my eye. I also like the quizzes, and the giveaways are good though I’ve never won. I also find it interesting to read other people’s thoughts on books which links to my next item…
  3. Other Blogs – I follow a decent number of blogs because I trust them, but sometimes I use them to find other  blogs through interesting comments.
  4. My TBR Excel spreadsheet – if a book makes it onto this list then I’m waaaaaay more likely to buy it. It’s also how I kept track of books I want to read that haven’t been published yet.
  5. WordPress – I find WordPress very helpful in terms of keeping track of how far behind/ahead I am with reviews. I like the schedule feature, as I really dislike writing the post on the same day it goes up.
  6. Bloglovin’ – it stops my email getting full of posts from blogs I follow.
  7. Memes – great way to find new interesting blogs. I take part in Top Ten Tuesday (obvs) and Sunday Post regularly. I also occasionally take part in Waiting on Wednesday and Showcase Sunday.
  8. Read-a-thons – a great way to interact with other blogs, and they also help you get your reading back on track. I like Bout of Books (which I’m taking part in this week) as it lets me set my own goals.
  9. Twitter – as a blogger I’ve noticed interaction is key, and Twitter is a good format for this imho. It also lets me promote things I find interesting, as well as my own stuff.
  10. Amazon/The Book Depository – not a huge fan of my local bookstore, and as far as I’m aware the only local independent bookstore has closed. I also can’t justify the cost of travelling to London to visit Foyles, so Amazon and The Book Depository it is for me on the whole. My shelves would be significantly emptier without them.

Those were my top ten things that make my life easier as a blogger. What things make your life easier as a blogger/reader? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (29)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Favourite Books Set In Real Life*

* By which I mean, we could pass the characters on the street.

1. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins [Goodreads]

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2. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Piccoult [Goodreads]

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3. Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn and David Leviathan [Goodreads]

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4. Lola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins [Goodreads]

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5. Ink by Amanda Sun [Goodreads]

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6. Vicky Angel by Jacqueline Wilson [Goodreads]

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7. The Secret of Ella and Micha by Jessica Sorensen [Goodreads]

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8. The Last Song by Nicholas Sparks [Goodreads]

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9. Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling [Goodreads]

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10. Die For Me by Amy Plum [Goodreads]

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The last two are a little bit of a cheat BUT they both start off in the “real” world, so I think they count 😉

Those were my top ten favourite books set in real life. What are your top ten books in x setting? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (28)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Nine Favorite Beginnings/Endings In Books

I’m going to focus on the beginnings side as the endings could be kinda spoiler-ish, and I want to encourage people to try these books. As well as not potentially spoil the ending for anyone reading them now. Some of these will probably be quite popular, but oh well. Oh, and I’m not limiting myself to middle grade or young adult or adult or “modern” or “classics”. It will be a mix.

Quotes are in no particular order. Enjoy 🙂

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling (MG) [Goodreads]

Mr and Mrs Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you’d expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they didn’t hold with such nonsense.
(Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling, Bloomsbury (London: 1997), p. 7)

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen [Goodreads]

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
(Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Oxford Children’s Classics (Oxford: 2010), p. 1)

White Cat by Holly Black (YA) [Goodreads]

I WAKE UP BAREFOOT, standing on cold tiles. Looking dizzily down. I suck in a breath of icy air.
(White Cat by Holly Black, Gollancz (London: 2010), p. 1)

A Kiss of Shadows by Laurell K. Hamilton [Goodreads]

TWENTY-THREE STORIES UP AND ALL I COULD SEE OUT the windows was grey smog. They could call it the City of Angels if they wanted to, but if angels were out there, they had to be flying blind.
(A Kiss of Shadows, Bantam Books (2001), p. 11)

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas (YA) [Goodreads] [review]

After a year of slavery in the Salt Mines of Endovier, Celaena Sardothien was accustomed to being escorted everywhere in shackles and at sword-point.
(Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, Bloomsbury (London: 2012), p. 1)

The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan (YA) [Goodreads]

THE PIPE UNDER THE SINK WAS LEAKING AGAIN. IT WOULDN’T have been so bad, except Nick kept his favourite sword under the sink.
(The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Breenan, Simon and Schuster (London, 2009), p. 1)

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater (YA) [Goodreads] [review]

Blue Sargent had forgotten how many times she’d been told that she would kill her true love.
(The Raven Boys, Scholastic (London: 2012), p. 1)

Moon Called by Patricia Briggs [Goodreads]

I didn’t realize he was a werewolf at first. My nose isn’t at its best when it is surrounded  by axle grease and burnt oil – and it’s not like there are a lot of stray werewolves running around.
(Moon Called by Patricia Briggs, Orbit (2008), p.1)

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins (YA) [Goodreads] [review]

Here is everything I know about France: Madeline and Amélie and Moulin Rouge. The Eiffel Tower and the Arc de Triomphe, although I have no idea what the function of either actually is.
(Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, Speak (2010), p. 3)

And just for a bit of fun, if you’re thinking about picking up The Raven Boys here are 10 more reasons why you should!

Those were nine of my favourite opening lines. What are your top ten beginnings/endings in books? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (27)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Words/Topics That Will Make You NOT pick up a book

I’m afraid this week will just be a list from me as I’m not good at searching for quirky/funny pictures. Sorry.

  1. For fans of X. Or some variation thereof. Invariably the book with the sticker that contains this wonderful statement is NOTHING LIKE the book they are comparing it to. NOTHING. Or, the ‘X’ is a book I don’t like so I’m left wondering if the sticker is accurate or not. Either way, that book is probably NOT going home with me.
  2. Period drama. This isn’t always true, but period genre is generally something that is more miss than hit for me. I’m okay with alternate histories where more modern attitudes are shown by the characters, as these seem to be pulled off better.
  3. Science Fiction/Fantasy. This may seem a little strange seeing as I LOVE THE HITCHHICKER’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and quite a few of Isaac Asimov’s books but – and this is a big but – modern books in this genre seem to be pretty much miss for me. I think because they quite often blur the line between fiction and fantasy with their science, and that just kills my interest.
  4. Horror/gore. It’s just not my thing. I did quite enjoy the HANNIBAL LECTER SERIES, but that was more psychological than anything. I don’t like the out-and-out horror, with lots of violence, torture, and gore.
  5. Retelling of book X. If I liked the original, why would I want to read a re-telling when I could read the original? If I didn’t like the original, why would this sell the book to me? Just saying.
  6. Second person narration. I know that this is technically cheating, as second person narration is not a word or topic BUT it is the thing most certain on this list to guarentee I will not read a book. Ever.
  7. Religion. I’m happy to read books with angels/demons/gods just as long as the author is not too heavy with their religious ideology. I don’t like feeling like the Bible/any other religious text is being rammed down my throat or the author is trying to convert me. To be on the safe side, generally I try to avoid.
  8. Time travel. I’ve never seen this done well.
  9. Travel in general. I’m including not just round the world trips, but also road trips. For me (generally) books that are very travel based seem a bit…well, forced. Sometimes it seems to be the only way that character A will meet character B, and they’ll fall in love whilst having adventure on the way… Although, to be fair, I do love some books which involve travel like the REVENANTS TRILOGY by Amy Plum, INK by Amanda Sun, and ANNA AND THE FRENCH KISS by Stephanie Perkins.
  10. Classics/Modern Classics. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule but I can quite honestly say that I have read all the books in this category that I’m interested in – and some I soooo wasn’t. My dislike of classics is probably due to the fact that you cannot study English Literature without being forced to read some god-awful books, most of which are usually classics of some sort.

What are the top ten words/topics that make you NOT pick up a book? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (26)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Best/Worst Movie Adaptations

Well, this should be interesting as I don’t really tend to watch book to film adaptations. Not really my kind of thing. Although to be honest, I haven’t really watched a lot of films recently.

The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien/ The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

I really enjoyed THE LORD OF THE RINGS both as a book and a film. Peter Jackson did a good job of capturing Tolkien’s world. I actually saw this film multiple times at the cinema, I was a little obsessed.

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien/ The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

I haven’t actually read Tolkien’s book yet, but I really enjoyed the film. I do plan on reading the book at some point.

Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl/ Beautiful Creatures (2012)

I read the book so I could watch the film, and then I ended up not watching the film >.<; Opps?!

The Hunger Games by Susan Collins/ The Hunger Games (2012)

I watched the film before I read the book, and really enjoyed both.

Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption by Steven King/ The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

Saw the film loved it, then years later I read the short story and loved it too.

I, Robot by Isaac Asimov/ I, Robot (2004)

I can’t remember in which order I watched/read these but this is one of the rare sci-fi books I like. The film was pretty good too. The Three Laws of Robotics are awesome, and well thought out.

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding/ Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)

I read the book as part of my undergraduate course and it wasn’t my cup of tea, and then I saw the odd clip of the film and it wasn’t my cup of tea either. I wouldn’t like to say if this was a good or bad adaptation.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote/ Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

LOVE this film, I’ve also read a bit of the novella and it’s very different from the film.

My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult/ My Sister’s Keeper (2009)

Read the book first, and although the film isn’t faithful to the book it is a good film.

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare/ Romeo + Juliet (1996)

I read the play and watched the film for my GCSE English. It’s definitely not my favourite of Shakespeare’s plays – I honestly think a lot of people forget/ignore how young Juliet is. The 1996 film is the best adaptation of the play for film I have seen.

PLUS, an extra that isn’t out but that I am tempted to see.

City of Bones of Bones by Cassandra Clare/ The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (2013)

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I really struggled writing this list as to be honest. What are your top ten best/worst book to film adaptations? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (25)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Five Most Intimidating Books

Well this should be an interesting topic…

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Fire and Ice #1) by George R. R. Martin

A NEW ORIGINAL SERIES, NOW ON HBO.

Here is the first volume in George R. R. Martin’s magnificent cycle of novels that includes A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords. As a whole, this series comprises a genuine masterpiece of modern fantasy, bringing together the best the genre has to offer. Magic, mystery, intrigue, romance, and adventure fill these pages and transport us to a world unlike any we have ever experienced. Already hailed as a classic, George R. R. Martin’s stunning series is destined to stand as one of the great achievements of imaginative fiction.

A GAME OF THRONES

Long ago, in a time forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons out of balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens.

Here an enigmatic band of warriors bear swords of no human metal; a tribe of fierce wildlings carry men off into madness; a cruel young dragon prince barters his sister to win back his throne; and a determined woman undertakes the most treacherous of journeys. Amid plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies hangs perilously in the balance, as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.

I am in turns desperate to read this series and terrified by it. I have heard great things about this series, but I have also been told it is insanely complicated. The first book alone is 800+ pages, and whilst this isn’t necessarily a bad thing it is ever so slightly intimidating – where would I find the time? And, what if I didn’t like it?

Throne of Jade (Temeraire #2) by Naomi Novik

When Britain intercepted a French ship and its precious cargo–an unhatched dragon’s egg–Capt. Will Laurence of HMS Reliant unexpectedly became master and commander of the noble dragon he named Temeraire. As new recruits in Britain’s Aerial Corps, man and dragon soon proved their mettle in daring combat against Bonaparte’s invading forces.

Now China has discovered that its rare gift, intended for Napoleon, has fallen into British hands–and an angry Chinese delegation vows to reclaim the remarkable beast. But Laurence refuses to cooperate. Facing the gallows for his defiance, Laurence has no choice but to accompany Temeraire back to the Far East–a long voyage fraught with peril, intrigue, and the untold terrors of the deep. Yet once the pair reaches the court of the Chinese emperor, even more shocking discoveries and darker dangers await.

I really loved reading the first book in this series Temeraire/His Majesty’s Dragon. It was both what I was expecting and something completely different. To be honest, I’m a bit scared that reading the second book in this series could mean that I fall out of love with it.

The 5th Wave (The Fifth Wave #1) by Rick Yancey

The Passage meets Ender’s Game in an epic new series from award-winning author Rick Yancey.

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother—or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

I have only heard good things about this series, but I don’t always get on well with Sci-Fi. It doesn’t always click for me, especially when it borders with Sci-Fan which is generally when it leaves me cold. The 5th Wave sounds really interesting but…

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

Smaug certainly looked fast asleep, when Bilbo peeped once more from the entrance. He was just about to step out on to the floor when he caught a sudden thin ray of red from under the drooping lid of Smaug’s left eye. He was only pretending to be asleep! He was watching the tunnel entrance…

Whisked away from his comfortable, unambitious life in his hobbit-hole in Bag End by Gandalf the wizard and a company of dwarves, Bilbo Baggins finds himself caught up in a plot to raid the treasure hoard of Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon…

I have to admit that I have watched the first film and enjoyed it, but I am a little nervous about trying this book. The Lord of the Rings is one of my favourite books, and I think Tolkien creates a really interesting world but for some reason I’m not totally sure that this book is for me. I’m also a bit worried that now I’ve seen the film first it will mean terrible things for my feelings about the book.

Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter thinks he is an ordinary boy – until he is rescued by an owl, taken to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, learns to play Quidditch and does battle in a deadly duel. The Reason: HARRY POTTER IS A WIZARD!

Having now drawn blood from a stone, I will be up front and say I hated this topic. Honestly, I don’t find any books intimidating (or if I do I forget about them quickly) so this topic was a real struggle! Even picking just five was an effort, although I am interested to see what you guys/gals think of as “intimidating books”.

(blurb from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone)

This is a bit different from the previous four books as I have actually read the complete Harry Potter series.

The reason I have included this series in this list is because I loved this series so much; I grew up with it. Thinking about re-reading it terrifies me. I don’t want to lose the magic that I associate with the series, and I think if I re-read the books I would. I know I’m probably being stupid, but I just don’t want to risk it.

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I really struggled writing this list as to be honest books don’t tend to intimidate me – or, at least I don’t remember them if they do. So I’m curious to see what other people have picked as “intimidating” books. What are your top ten most intimidating books? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (24)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Nine Books At The Top Of My Summer TBR List

My list includes books that are coming out between June and August, as well as books that I want to read during the summer. The list is made up of a mixture of Middle Grade, Young Adult, and Adult books. As always blurbs are taken from Goodreads.com and the release dates are according to Amazon.co.uk.

Ink (Paper Gods #1) by Amanda Sun [Goodreads]

A MAGIC MIGHTIER THAN ANY SWORD

A DESTINY THAT CAN’T BE DENIED

Katie Greene is lost in the wake of her mum’s death. Sent to Japan, she meets gorgeous but aloof artist Tomohiro, whose tough attitude intrigues and scares her. Then things get really strange. When they’re near each other, Tomohiro’s drawings start to come to life…

Soon the wrong people begin to ask questions, and Katie and Tomohiro must risk everything to protect the truth.

I’m actually currently reading this book as I managed to get a copy via NetGalley 🙂 I think the cover is gorgeous, and the concept of the book is really interesting. It’s released in the UK on 5th July 2013.

Doll Bones by Holly Black [Goodreads]

Zach, Poppy and Alice have been friends for ever. They love playing with their action figure toys, imagining a magical world of adventure and heroism. But disaster strikes when, without warning, Zach’s father throws out all his toys, declaring he’s too old for them. Zach is furious, confused and embarrassed, deciding that the only way to cope is to stop playing . . . and stop being friends with Poppy and Alice. But one night the girls pay Zach a visit, and tell him about a series of mysterious occurrences. Poppy swears that she is now being haunted by a china doll – who claims that it is made from the ground-up bones of a murdered girl. They must return the doll to where the girl lived, and bury it. Otherwise the three children will be cursed for eternity . . .

This book is already released, and there is in fact a copy of it sitting in my TBR pile. I really liked some of Holly Black’s books so I thought I would give this one a try as it sounds quite spooky.

Affliction (Anita Blake Vampire Hunter #22) by Laurell K. Hamilton [Goodreads]

Micah is called back home by his estranged family, because his father, a county sheriff, has been attacked and is terribly injured. Anita and Nathaniel are going with him for moral support and to meet his family under very trying circumstances.

Micah has been estranged from his family for a decade, deliberately turning his back on them to protect them from the sadistic killer who once led his leopard pack. But now Micah’s father lies dying, rotting away inside from some strange ailment that has his doctors whispering about “zombie disease.”

Anita—who understands zombies better than anyone—knows there’s more to it than that. While zombies have unlovable traits, being one doesn’t cause human beings to rot in agony. She needs to solve that mystery—but now a more immediate issue is pressing: Micah’s father may have only five days to live.

I have to say I’m really looking forward to reading this Anita book. I think it will be interesting to finally know a little more about Micah’s family and actually get to see them. It’s released in the UK on 2nd July 2013.

Loki’s Wolves (The Blackwell Pages #1) by K. L. Armstrong and M. A. Marr [Goodreads]

In Viking times, Norse myths predicted the end of the world, an event called Ragnarok, that only the gods can stop. When this apocalypse happens, the gods must battle the monsters–wolves the size of the sun, serpents that span the seabeds, all bent on destroying the world.

The gods died a long time ago.

Matt Thorsen knows every Norse myth, saga, and god as if it was family history–because it is family history. Most people in the modern-day town of Blackwell, South Dakota, in fact, are direct descendants of either Thor or Loki, including Matt’s classmates Fen and Laurie Brekke.

However, knowing the legends and completely believing them are two different things. When the rune readers reveal that Ragnarok is coming and kids–led by Matt–will stand in for the gods in the final battle, he can hardly believe it. Matt, Laurie, and Fen’s lives will never be the same as they race to put together an unstoppable team to prevent the end of the world.

I already own a copy of this, but I am looking forward to diving into this. Kelley Armstrong is one of my favourite authors, and I really enjoyed Melissa Marr’s Wicked Lovely series so I thought it might be fun to try this book written by both of them.

Omens (Cainsville #1) by Kelley Armstrong [Goodreads]

Twenty-four-year-old Olivia Taylor Jones has the perfect life. The only daughter of a wealthy, prominent Chicago family, she has an Ivy League education, pursues volunteerism and philanthropy, and is engaged to a handsome young tech firm CEO with political ambitions.

But Olivia’s world is shattered when she learns that she’s adopted. Her real parents? Todd and Pamela Larsen, notorious serial killers serving a life sentence. When the news brings a maelstrom of unwanted publicity to her adopted family and fiancé, Olivia decides to find out the truth about the Larsens.

Olivia ends up in the small town of Cainsville, Illinois, an old and cloistered community that takes a particular interest in both Olivia and her efforts to uncover her birth parents’ past.

Aided by her mother’s former lawyer, Gabriel Walsh, Olivia focuses on the Larsens’ last crime, the one her birth mother swears will prove their innocence. But as she and Gabriel start investigating the case, Olivia finds herself drawing on abilities that have remained hidden since her childhood, gifts that make her both a valuable addition to Cainsville and deeply vulnerable to unknown enemies. Because there are darker secrets behind her new home, and powers lurking in the shadows that have their own plans for her.

As I mentioned above, I am a HUGE Kelley Armstrong fan and as she has recently finished her brilliant Women of the Otherworld series I thought I would try her new one. Oh, and I really love the cover It is released in the UK on 20th August 2013.

This Is What Happy Looks Like by Jennifer E. Smitih [Goodreads]

If fate sent you an email, would you answer?

In This is What Happy Looks Like, Jennifer E. Smith’s new YA novel, perfect strangers Graham Larkin and Ellie O’Neill meet—albeit virtually—when Graham accidentally sends Ellie an email about his pet pig, Wilbur. In the tradition of romantic movies like “You’ve Got Mail” and “Sleepless in Seattle,” the two 17-year-olds strike up an email relationship, even though they live on opposite sides of the country and don’t even know each other’s first names.

Through a series of funny and poignant messages, Graham and Ellie make a true connection, sharing intimate details about their lives, hopes and fears. But they don’t tell each other everything; Graham doesn’t know the major secret hidden in Ellie’s family tree, and Ellie is innocently unaware that Graham is actually a world-famous teen actor living in Los Angeles.

When the location for the shoot of Graham’s new film falls through, he sees an opportunity to take their relationship from online to in-person, managing to get the production relocated to picturesque Henley, Maine, where Ellie lives. But can a star as famous as Graham have a real relationship with an ordinary girl like Ellie? And why does Ellie’s mom want her to avoid the media’s spotlight at all costs?

Just as they did in The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, the hands of fate intervene in wondrous ways in this YA novel that delivers on high concept romance in lush and thoughtful prose.

I have a copy of this already sitting on my shelf just waiting to be read. I’ve heard some really good things about both the author and the book itself, so I’m interested to see if it lives up to the hype.

US cover

Biting Bad (Chicagoland Vampires #8) by Chloe Neill [Goodreads]

Merit has been a vampire for only a short while, but she’s already seen a lifetime’s worth of trouble. She and her Master, centuries-old Ethan Sullivan, have risked their lives time and again to save the city they love. But not all of Chicago is loving them back.

Anti-vampire riots are erupting all over town, striking vampires where it hurts the most. A splinter group armed with Molotov cocktails and deep-seated hate is intent on clearing the fanged from the Windy City come hell or high water.

Merit and her allies rush to figure out who’s behind the attacks, who will be targeted next, and whether there’s any way to stop the wanton destruction. The battle for Chicago is just beginning, and Merit is running out of time.

I’m really loving this series. Merit is a brilliant character, and I love the way vampires and politics are handled in this series. It comes out in the UK on 8th August 2013.

Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein [Goodreads]

Rose Justice is a young American ATA pilot, delivering planes and taxiing pilots for the RAF in the UK during the summer of 1944. A budding poet who feels most alive while flying, she discovers that not all battles are fought in the air. An unforgettable journey from innocence to experience from the author of the best-selling, multi-award-nominated Code Name Verity. From the exhilaration of being the youngest pilot in the British air transport auxiliary, to the aftermath of surviving the notorious Ravensbruck women’s concentration camp, Rose’s story is one of courage in the face of adversity. Code Name Verity is shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal.

This is already out and sitting on my shelf. I loved Code Name Verity when it came out, so I’m hoping that this book will live up to my expectations!

Crown of Midnight (Throne of Glass #2) by Sarah J. Maas [Goodreads]

Eighteen-year-old Celaena Sardothien is bold, daring and beautiful – the perfect seductress and the greatest assassin her world has ever known. But though she won the King’s contest and became his champion, Celaena has been granted neither her liberty nor the freedom to follow her heart. The slavery of the suffocating salt mines of Endovier that scarred her past is nothing compared to a life bound to her darkest enemy, a king whose rule is so dark and evil it is near impossible to defy. Celaena faces a choice that is tearing her heart to pieces: kill in cold blood for a man she hates, or risk sentencing those she loves to death. Celaena must decide what she will fight for: survival, love or the future of a kingdom. Because an assassin cannot have it all . . . And trying to may just destroy her.

Love or loathe Celaena, she will slice open your heart with her dagger and leave you bleeding long after the last page of the highly anticipated sequel in what is undeniably THE hottest new fantasy series.

I really enjoyed Throne of Glass when it came out last year, and thought Celaena was a kick-ass character. I cannot wait to see what Mass has done with this book. I also think the cover looks gorgeous. It comes out in the UK on 15th August 2013.

I cannot believe that I have come up with a list of just nine again – sorry!

What are the top ten books on your summer TBR pile? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (23)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Nine Beach Reads

So it’s up to us to define how we view “beach reads”… When I think of “beach reads” (I don’t read when I go to the beach, normally because I only do so out of season but yeah…) I think of books which are light, and fun, and quick. This list is also going to comprise of books I have read; I’m not going to include any upcoming reads or books I’ve heard good things about and want to read myself (thinking about next weeks topic). With that in mind, here is my list (in no particular order):

This Must Be Love by Tui Sutherland [review] [Goodreads]

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins [review] [Goodreads]

Going Vintage by Lindsey Leavitt [review] [Goodreads]

Blue Bloods by Melissa de la Cruz [Goodreads]

Heist Society by Ally Carter [review] [Goodreads]

My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick [review] [Goodreads]

Immortal City by Scott Speer [review] [Goodreads]

Shooting Stars by Allison Rushby [review] [Goodreads]

L.A. Candy by Lauren Conrad [Goodreads]

What are your top ten beach reads? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.

Top Ten Tuesday (22)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at The Broke and the Bookish. They’d love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

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This weeks Top Ten topic is …

Top Ten Books Featuring Travel In Some Way

Epic fantasies seem to be the only books I read that really feature travel, I’d never thought about that before. Here’s my list in no particular order.

The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

Fleabag and the Ring Fire by Beth Webb

Sabriel (Abhorsen #1) by Garth Nix

Pawn of Prophecy (The Belgariad #1) by David Eddings

The Ambassador’s Mission (Traitor Spy Trilogy #1) by Trudi Canavan

The Magic in the Weaving (Circle of Magic #1) by Tamora Pierce

Vessel by Sarah Beth Durst

Magic Study (Study #2) by Maria V. Snyder

The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom (The League of Princes #1) by Christopher Healy

Fire (Graceling Realms #2) by Kristin Cashore

What are your top ten books which feature travel in some way? Let me know in the comments below, or link back to your Top Ten post so I can see what makes your list.