Reviewlets: Becoming The Supervet: Listening to the Animals by Noel Fitzpatrick & The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exputéry, translated by Michael Morpurgo

So you may have noticed from the title, but this is something a little different to normal. I try to write reasonable length reviews about the books I read, but sometimes I have something I want to say but it’s a struggle to get something that I consider a review length piece. I’ve noticed that this means that I don’t really want to read after this, so I decided to do something a little different. Instead of struggling to find something to say to fill a whole review, I thought instead I’d offer a short (between 100 and 200 words) review – a reviewlet if you will. I hope this works well for you as well. I’ve got several of these scheduled, so I’d love to know your thoughts on the format.

Becoming The Supervet: Listening to the Animals by Noel Fitzpatrick ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (4 stars)

Becoming The Supervet: Listening to the Animals by Noel Fitzpatrick

If you are a fan of the tv show The Supervet, and of Noel Fitzpatrick then you will enjoy this book. I thought it was a very interesting read, though a lot of the time his ideas went completely over my head because the science/maths was just a bit too much for me. It was interesting to learn about his past, and to see how he got to where he is now.This is definitely a must read for anyone interested in getting into veterinary medicine, or with some link to it. My only slight complaint is that the narrative isn’t necessarily linear, which I found confusing at times. It’s not a book I’ll go back to, but I definitely enjoyed reading it and seeing how far veterinary medicine has come – and how far, in a lot of ways, it still has to go. Noel’s idea of “One Medicine” is a really interesting one, and one I hope is explored in the future as it seems to have a lot of potential.

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exputéry, translated by Michael Morpurgo ⭐️⭐️ (2 stars)

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, translated by Michael Morpurgo

I don’t know if it was Antoine de Saint-Exputéry’s story or Michael Morpurgo’s translation of it, but this book really did not resonate well with me. I can kind of see why so many people love it, but it honestly just leaves me cold. Maybe I’m not in touch enough with my younger self to enjoy it. Certainly a lot of people seem to enjoy this story, whether in its original french or in a translation. The story itself has a certain whimsey to it, as do the illustrations. This is not a book for anyone who prefers linear narratives. It reminds me a bit of Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, which I absolutely hated but which I suspect people who enjoyed that will enjoy this.

Thanks for reading, until next time.

Review: Moranifesto by Caitlin Moran

Moranifesto by Caitlin Moran

Title: Moranifesto
Authors: Caitlin Moran
Genre: Autobiography, Essays, Feminism, Humour, Non-Fiction
Source: The publisher via NetGalley
Publisher: Ebury Press (9th March 2017)
Blurb:

Review: You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day

You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day

Title: You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)
Author: Felicia Day
Genre: Autobiography
Publisher: Sphere (13th August 2015)
Blurb:

From online entertainment pioneer, actress and ‘queen of the geeks’ Felicia Day, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is a funny, quirky and inspiring memoir about her unusual upbringing, her rise to internet stardom and embracing her weirdness to find her place in the world.

When Felicia Day was a girl, all she wanted was to connect with other kids (desperately). Growing up in the Deep South, where she was ‘home-schooled for hippie reasons’, she looked online to find her tribe. The internet was in its infancy and she became an early adopter at every stage of its growth – finding joy and unlikely friendships in the emerging digital world. Her relative isolation meant that she could pursue passions like gaming, calculus and the 1930s detective novels without shame. Because she had no idea how ‘uncool’ she really was.

But if it hadn’t been for her strange background – the awkwardness continued when she started college at sixteen, her mother driving her to campus every day – she might never have had the naive confidence to forge her own path. Like when she graduated as valedictorian with a maths degree and then headed to Hollywood to pursue a career in acting despite having zero contacts. Or when she tired of being typecast as the crazy cat-lady secretary and decided to create her own web series before people in showbusiness understood that online video would be more than just cats chasing laser pointers.

Felicia’s rags-to-riches rise to internet fame launched her career as one of the most unfluential creators in new media. Now Felicia’s world is filled with creativity, video games and a dash of feminist activism – like her memoir.

Showcasing Felicia’s hilarious and unique voice, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should celebrate what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now – even for a digital misfit.

Rating: *** (3 stars)
Review:

YOU’RE NEVER WEIRD ON THE INTERNET (ALMOST) is an autobiography by Felicia Day. It tells the story of her childhood and growing up in the Deep South up to when she was doxxed during the #GamerGate mess.

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